What you need to know about a spa at home

What you need to know about a spa at home

First of all, you should know that buying a spa will be more profitable than you will ever know and that it is used properly, it will bring to your family more benefits than you can even imagine.

Safety is the first point to emphasize. Because of the risk of drowning in a spa, if you have one, you need to invest in a locking cover. Children can not fall into a spa if there is a locking lid on it. A blanket will also do two other things; it will keep debris suspended in the air, whether the spa is inside or outside, and will extend the life of the filters, but it can also serve as a heat keeper. By placing a lid on the spa when not in use, in many cases the heat will not escape and it will be much easier to maintain a balance in the water temperature.

Today's spas consume much less energy than in the last 30 years, and what was needed before to heat and operate costs a fraction of that cost. The other option for heating a spa is in models powered by solar energy. Since these baths are heated by solar energy, the use of electricity is not necessary and will not affect your energy bills.

Spas are self-contained and once they have been filled with water, they will reuse this same water until it is drained and refilled. That being said, it is important to keep the water clean in your spa. The water is sucked and then treated through a filter before returning to the bath. As a result, filters play a very important role in this process and must be maintained regularly. It is even suggested to physically remove the filters and wash them with a hose until they are clean every week. If the filter does not seem to be cleaning, you can use filter cleaners, but with weekly maintenance, this should not be necessary. The filters eventually wear out and a full filter replacement every three to six months should keep your spa clean.

In addition to the filters that do their job to keep things in order, the spa owner must understand that there are always particles that end up in the tub, no matter how clean, and if they are not treated they can be harmful. So what are you doing with them? The spa will require chemical treatment including chlorine tablets and an important anti-foam agent for extended use of your spa. If you live in an area where water is considered hard, it is best to add a chemical anti-scale that will help prevent the build-up of calcium deposits that may permanently stain your spa.

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