The Right Way to Shower



You may look at the title of this article and think to yourself that you had no clue there was actually a right and a wrong way to shower. Well, according to health officials there definitely is.

Keeping yourself clean is not only healthy for yourself but also for those around you. You are in control of your health, and showering can help you avoid certain medical conditions.

Yes, there is a right way to shower as well as a number of things to consider when showering.

Everyone wants to look clean, smell great, and have glowing skin, but if you aren’t showering correctly, you may look and smell great but have dry and damaged skin.

Let’s look at some key considerations for showering the right way.

Dry and Damaged

You should understand that there are potential risk factors if your bathing habits aren’t done properly. For instance, if you are like me, you may love to take a steaming hot shower every day.

Did you know that extremely hot water is perfect if you are looking to have dry skin? I didn’t know this either, and now I understand why I have battled dry skin most of my life.

If you are hoping for that just-cleaned, fresh, silky glow, hot showers are not your friend. The same is true when washing your face.

For a healthy face, be sure you are washing in cool to warm water. If the water is too hot, you’re at risk for dry damaged skin.

Warm water is your safest bet for bathing. Water that is too hot has a tendency to strip the natural oils from your skin which we already know leads to dry skin.

While this might send a chill through your body at first, lukewarm to warm is best.

How Often

So you may now be wondering how often is too often for showering. I’m glad you asked. Based on your personal health and any potential issues that could be negatively affected by bathing, the average is at least three times per week.

However, this greatly depends on just how active, sweaty, and stinky you get.

If you are a marathon runner in training, your family would probably appreciate you showering every day after your run.

If you are a stay-at-home parent caring for tiny humans all day who use you as a spit rag, you may need to shower more often but may not be able to. In that case, sponge-bathing is your friend.

Bathing more than once a day isn’t the best for you but if you must, keep those types of days to a minimum.

Everything in Order

There is definitely an appropriate order to showering. Start at the top and work your way down. Washing in this order is the sanitary side of the process.

Wash Your Face

You should always wash your face at the sink before getting into the shower. Use cool to warm water. Some soaps may dry out your skin‌ so be sure to choose a cleanser or soap that is healthy and gentle for your skin.

Ask your dermatologist or physician for suggestions, especially if you have acne. Always rinse in cool water to close your pores. This helps to keep bacteria out.

Wash Your Hair First

If you are planning to wash your hair, I recommend brushing it out before you get it wet. Then wash your hair first before washing your body.


Apply your favorite shampoo and work into a lather. Rinse in cool water. This closes the hair cuticle and prevents that frizzing that so many of us hate.

Apply conditioner and rinse immediately. Contrary to popular belief, it is not better to leave it in your hair. Rinse in cool water again to close the hair cuticle and retain some of its silky shine.

Start at Your Neck

Next, grab some soap and, starting at your neck, work your way down. Be sure to do what your mother taught you and get behind your ears!

Then, work your lather down, rinsing in sections as you go. This keeps soap from building up on your skin and makes it easier to get cleaned off. It also keeps the dirty soap from rinsing over your clean parts.

Make sure you are hitting the high points if you are in a hurry. For the love of humanity, wash your armpits well! The world will thank you for it.

Wash your pelvic area and private parts well. However, be careful to not get lather or soap in places it shouldn’t be (talking to you, ladies).

Lastly, wash those nasty feet, and scrub between your toes. Rinse your body in lukewarm water, and you are done!

Everything You Want to Know about Soap

Sharing a bar of soap with your family is generally acceptable. Keep in mind that hot water and soap can strip your skin of natural oils so make sure you are using a moisturizing soap.

All soaps do not clean all body parts equally. You shouldn’t want to use face soap all over your body and expect the same results.

If you are looking for healthy and clean, try to look for an organic and natural soap to promote healthy skin.

Don’t Share Your Loofah

Gross. Loofahs, sponges, and washcloths all harbor bacteria. If you use the same loofah as your teenage son, you are washing your body with all of his nasty bacteria.

Family closeness is a great concept but not when it comes to personal cleanliness.

Make sure you are washing your washcloths every couple of days and changing out your loofahs and sponges often.

The same is true for bath towels. Use your own towel and wash it regularly.

Lotion Up

Finally, you are dried off and feeling like a million bucks. Your shower was invigorating and you are ready to conquer the day.

But not so fast — use a moisturizing lotion to replenish the moisture to your skin that is lost in the shower; this is especially true if you are still taking steaming hot showers.

Bathing and showering is a luxury that most of us take for granted. Unfortunately, it isn’t a luxury that everyone on the planet has.

If you are one of the lucky ones, take advantage of the shower and keep the body odor to a minimum. As with anything else, it is important to do it the right and healthy way.

Robyn Flint, QuickQuote.com
Robyn Flint

Robyn Flint writes and researches for the life insurance site, QuickQuote.com and has an MS in Clinical Mental Health Counseling. She is the mother of three and grandmother of three so she is an advocate of proper bathing. Robyn is a licensed realtor, freelance writer, and a published author.
 




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